Socrates and Spirituality

“The unexamined life is not worth living.” Socrates

I am huge proponent for self-awareness and self-examination. This is partly due to my vocational choice but also a natural part of my personality. If we don’t understand why we are reacting, feeling, thinking, or believing in a certain way how can we realistically align ourselves with truth and continue on a path of spiritual growth? After all, it has been said that the definition of insanity is doing the same thing over and over and expecting different results.

Yet, many Christians opt for the “easy out” by refusing to take a deeper look within their own hearts. I’ve often wondered if the lack of self-examination is rooted in the fear of what might be found in the deepest places of our hearts if we really looked. While these dark places may cause us to face the reality of our human depravity, we cannot begin to remedy the condition of our hearts without first bringing it to light.

Gary Thomas wrote in The Beautiful Fight that “when we stop focusing on growing, we usually regress. That’s why, even though perfection may not be possible, the journey toward it is still well worth taking.” This is why we must stop now and then and take inventory of our hearts. Be aware of what is occurring in our hearts. This allows us to focus on growth. An unexamined heart may leave us in a place of stagnation and ultimately leave us to regress in our spiritual walks. My hope for you, dear reader, is that you find the strength and courage to look within and be blessed with growth as a result.

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